Sunday, October 10, 2010

Beauty is in the Eyes of the (Be)holder

Regardless of how we see one thing, it’s bound to be viewed differently by others. That’s even in reference to others’ liking as compared to the inclination of those from it has a partial attachment. What if the matter at hand is pertaining to physical attributes of people? Needless to say, people have different tastes and inclined from that of different standards. Those with a soft spot for (say) the “assessed” person will probably be defensive of any criticism in contrast with how they positively consider the looks of that person they’ve kind of developed fondness for.

Children for instance or babies for that matter, in most likely probability, they’ll be considered adorable by their own parents. Even with a decent disposition in line with accommodating the stark reality bequeathed among them or their children, it would still be hurtful for parents to hear (from other people) how “ugly” their children are. It may not be attributed directly but anything suggestive of an insensitive truth still hurts. Thus, it would be considerate of anyone not to state the obvious…


There are however people who seem to be as natural in manifesting their meanness. Their conceit over their good looks lacks the inner beauty that really matters. No matter how physically attractive you are, if you’re too critical of others at the expense of their feelings, that is being way uglier (that’s “BULLYful” not beautiful). Based on your standards, appreciate the difference instead and keep your spiteful outlook to yourself… Do not even be too belligerent in justifying it by claiming that you’re merely being honest. Honesty is revealed subsequent to a subject in-need of a truthful answer; it’s not exposed notwithstanding the absence of a related question. All the same, constructive criticism is rather sought or perhaps good-naturedly offered. Don’t be too proud either for you could be humbled. As much as honesty may differ from being brutally frank, as earlier stated, it would be better off kept to one’s thought if only to manifest respect and understanding for each other’s difference in judgment. Moreover, it’s unselfishly with due consideration for other’s feelings.


On the other hand, if you are at the criticized end, let their denouncements prove that you are way better by ignoring it. It’s not some means to be tolerant of such wickedness but it’s just a waste of time to ironically stoop down to their “leveled up prettiness” – pretty ugly level that is.


Our existences have respective yet interrelated causes including how we as a purpose are distinctly presented. One’s “ugliness” is beautifully serving to make a difference for constructive realization…

Though parents have to realize if their babies (their children), as they most likely deem, are cute or they’re purely manifesting “parental bias”. Nevertheless, it does not give any parent (or anyone) the right to be discriminating of others. It would be helpful for both sides to realize as well how we could regard the disparity for a good cause as it should. In consideration of our children being next in line, we don’t want a constant generation of condemnatory critics…

Accordingly, everybody’s beautiful… every baby’s cute… especially to the beholder…

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